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10-10-2017
04.05.2016 14:00

Kazimierz Michałowski Memorial Lectures


Kazimierz Michałowski Memorial Lectures is a new series of lectures organized by the PCMA Research Centre in Cairo, in cooperation with the Egyptian Ministry of Antiquities to commemorate the life of Kazimierz Michałowski, a pioneer of Polish archaeological research in Egypt and the founder of Polish Mediterranean archaeology.

The series is on the bicentennial of the University of Warsaw, where Kazimierz Michałowski established the first Chair of Classical Archaeology in 1931. In 1959 he opened the university’s Research Centre in Cairo, which functions to this day, now as a branch of the PCMA.

Twice a year, each spring and autumn, we will invite eminent scholars to deliver a lecture related to Kazimierz Michałowski’s rich scientific legacy.

Under the auspices of H.E. Prof. Khaled el-Anany, Minister of Antiquities, Dr. Artur Obłuski, the director of the Research Centre in Cairo, Polish Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology, University of Warsaw is pleased to invite you to an opening lecture of the Kazimierz Michałowski Memorial Lectures series.  

Prof. Michał Gawlikowski

former director of the Polish Centre of Mediterranean Archaeology, University of Warsaw

“Palmyra: the ruins and the memory”

which will be held on 10 May 2016, at 6 p.m.,

at Ahmed Pasha Kamal Hall, Ministry of Antiquities, 

3 Adel Abu Bakr Street, Zamalek.

The barbarous destruction of some of the most important monuments of the Syrian desert city and the sack of its museum can be fully assessed only now after Palmyra has been returned under government control. The irreversible loss of so many treasures of ancient art does not detract, however, from the achievement of an international community of archaeologists excavating Palmyra, including the Polish expedition active there for more than half a century. The lecture highlights this achievement, illustrating the splendid and unique civilization of Palmyra in all its glory from the 1st through the 3rd century AD. Those eager for a view of the current status of Palmyra's antiquities will get the opportunity with a special report from Polish specialists who visited the city in April 2016.