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NEWSLETTER PCMA 2010

Hellenistic and Graeco-Roman Period

Jiyeh (Lebanon)

Dates of work: 26 August–8 October 2010

Team:

Director: Dr. Tomasz Waliszewski, archaeologist (Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw)

Archaeologists: Mariusz Gwiazda (PhD candidate, Antiquity of Southeastern Europe Research Centre, University of Warsaw), Kamil Kopij (PhD candidate, Institute of Archaeology, Jagiellonian University), Zofia Kowarska (PhD candidate, Antiquity of Southeastern Europe Research Centre, University of Warsaw), Robert Krzywdziński (independent), Filip Kuczma (independent), Szymon Lenarczyk (PhD candidate, Antiquity of Southeastern Europe Research Centre, University of Warsaw), Magdalena Makowska (independent), Karol Ochnio (independent), Joanna Pazio (independent), Elżbieta Strachocińska (independent), Agnieszka Szulc-Kajak (independent)

Ceramologists: Urszula Wicenciak (PhD candidate, Antiquity of Southeastern Europe Research Centre, University of Warsaw), Dr. Krzysztof Domżalski (Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology, Polish Academy of Sciences)

Glass specialist: Marcin Wagner (Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw)

Photographers: Miron Bogacki (Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw)

Student-trainees: Sylwia Betcher, Aleksandra Chołuj, Joanna Ciesielska, Sylwia Krawczyk, Aleksander Leydo, Piotr Makowski, Sławomir Poloczek, Karolina Pawlik and Krzysztof Stasiak (all from the Institute of Archaeology, University of Warsaw)

The archaeological fieldwork in 2010 at the site of Jiyeh (ancient Porphyreon), situated on the Mediterranean coast between ancient Berytus and Sidon, focused in on full-scale excavations of the Late Antique streets and residential quarter (4th–7th century AD ), uncovering 21 rooms and three alleys. The results contributed to a better understanding of the street network in the quarter and the nature of the architecture. The quarter comprising the 21 newly uncovered rooms taken together with 80 from earlier fieldwork in 2008 and 2009 formed an extensive residential complex, approximately 40 m by 35 m. It is a unique example of private domestic architecture illustrating everyday life in Roman and Byzantine Phoenicia. A bread oven (tannur) suggested the presence of a bakery in this part of the settlement.

[Text: PAM]

Contact
T. Waliszewski: twaliszewski@uw.edu.pl